Undertoad

The random tangents that move my mind
wmill:

Oh and here’s one more GIF.

wmill:

Oh and here’s one more GIF.

dogshaming:

D.O.G. Phone home?
Mom and Dad went on a trip. Then the dog sitter went to work. I was lonely so I tried to call. But the phone …. broke?

dogshaming:

D.O.G. Phone home?

Mom and Dad went on a trip. Then the dog sitter went to work. I was lonely so I tried to call. But the phone …. broke?

jtotheizzoe:

Ever wonder why we read the comments when we know we should never, ever read the damn comments? BrainCraft has a bit of troll psychology to share with you, about why we have to look, why anonymity breeds horrible behavior, and what negative effects abusive comments may have on the content they exist beneath (like, I dunno, educational YouTube videos?)

But more than all that, this video is about specific abuse that Vanessa and other female creators receive on a daily basis. Sure, we all get trolls of some kind, but the worst comment I see on an OKTBS video isn’t even close to what female creators have to deal with.

Not only do abusive comments make YouTube a dangerous place for creators like Vanessa (or Emily, who made a similar video last year), it makes it a dangerous place for people who are there to learn. We can not and should not allow this to happen.

Positive environments are something that we must just demand and *POOF* the internet will become a safe place full of rainbows and unicorns and intellectually stimulating discourse. We must actively work to create positive environments wherever we go on the web. So if you see something, say something, and make sure that trollish behavior and hate speech are not welcome anywhere where you are online, especially places where we’re trying to educate, inspire, and learn. 

Also, white bears.


From Earth Science Picture Of The Day; August 1, 2014:
Bioluminescence and Galactic GlowPhotographer: Fefo Bouvier; Summary Author: Fefo Bouvier, Jim Foster
The photo above shows a stunning contrast of Noctiluca bioluminescence in the Atlantic Ocean at Barra de Valizas, Uruguay, and overhead, the glow of the Milky Way in one of the darkest skies in the world. Bioluminescent dinoflagellates are responsible for the electric blue light. Marine organisms may exhibit bioluminescence (cold light) to either attract prey or to discourage predators. This phenomenon occurs occasionally along the Uruguayan coast, but it’s rarely captured with such brilliance as is displayed here. Photo taken on June 27, 2014.

From Earth Science Picture Of The Day; August 1, 2014:

Bioluminescence and Galactic Glow
Photographer: Fefo Bouvier; Summary Author: Fefo Bouvier, Jim Foster

The photo above shows a stunning contrast of Noctiluca bioluminescence in the Atlantic Ocean at Barra de Valizas, Uruguay, and overhead, the glow of the Milky Way in one of the darkest skies in the world. Bioluminescent dinoflagellates are responsible for the electric blue light. Marine organisms may exhibit bioluminescence (cold light) to either attract prey or to discourage predators. This phenomenon occurs occasionally along the Uruguayan coast, but it’s rarely captured with such brilliance as is displayed here. Photo taken on June 27, 2014.

(Source: wigmund, via luminolounge)