Undertoad

The random tangents that move my mind
wmill:

Oh and here’s one more GIF.

wmill:

Oh and here’s one more GIF.

dogshaming:

D.O.G. Phone home?
Mom and Dad went on a trip. Then the dog sitter went to work. I was lonely so I tried to call. But the phone …. broke?

dogshaming:

D.O.G. Phone home?

Mom and Dad went on a trip. Then the dog sitter went to work. I was lonely so I tried to call. But the phone …. broke?

jtotheizzoe:

Ever wonder why we read the comments when we know we should never, ever read the damn comments? BrainCraft has a bit of troll psychology to share with you, about why we have to look, why anonymity breeds horrible behavior, and what negative effects abusive comments may have on the content they exist beneath (like, I dunno, educational YouTube videos?)

But more than all that, this video is about specific abuse that Vanessa and other female creators receive on a daily basis. Sure, we all get trolls of some kind, but the worst comment I see on an OKTBS video isn’t even close to what female creators have to deal with.

Not only do abusive comments make YouTube a dangerous place for creators like Vanessa (or Emily, who made a similar video last year), it makes it a dangerous place for people who are there to learn. We can not and should not allow this to happen.

Positive environments are something that we must just demand and *POOF* the internet will become a safe place full of rainbows and unicorns and intellectually stimulating discourse. We must actively work to create positive environments wherever we go on the web. So if you see something, say something, and make sure that trollish behavior and hate speech are not welcome anywhere where you are online, especially places where we’re trying to educate, inspire, and learn. 

Also, white bears.


From Earth Science Picture Of The Day; August 1, 2014:
Bioluminescence and Galactic GlowPhotographer: Fefo Bouvier; Summary Author: Fefo Bouvier, Jim Foster
The photo above shows a stunning contrast of Noctiluca bioluminescence in the Atlantic Ocean at Barra de Valizas, Uruguay, and overhead, the glow of the Milky Way in one of the darkest skies in the world. Bioluminescent dinoflagellates are responsible for the electric blue light. Marine organisms may exhibit bioluminescence (cold light) to either attract prey or to discourage predators. This phenomenon occurs occasionally along the Uruguayan coast, but it’s rarely captured with such brilliance as is displayed here. Photo taken on June 27, 2014.

From Earth Science Picture Of The Day; August 1, 2014:

Bioluminescence and Galactic Glow
Photographer: Fefo Bouvier; Summary Author: Fefo Bouvier, Jim Foster

The photo above shows a stunning contrast of Noctiluca bioluminescence in the Atlantic Ocean at Barra de Valizas, Uruguay, and overhead, the glow of the Milky Way in one of the darkest skies in the world. Bioluminescent dinoflagellates are responsible for the electric blue light. Marine organisms may exhibit bioluminescence (cold light) to either attract prey or to discourage predators. This phenomenon occurs occasionally along the Uruguayan coast, but it’s rarely captured with such brilliance as is displayed here. Photo taken on June 27, 2014.

(Source: wigmund, via luminolounge)

libutron:

Some notes on bioluminescence in fungi
Some fungi emit light. Luminescence can be present in mycelia (as in a number of Mycena species) or in both the mycelia and the fruiting body (as in North American populations of Panellus stypticus).
Mushroom (fruiting body) lights have been described as blue, white, or green depending on the species; and emission intensities vary considerably.
It is said that in the forests of Borneo Mycena manipularis (shown above) are visible at 40 meters. It has also been said that it is even possible to read in the light of the fungi. Others mushrooms are dimmer and the eye often requires several minutes of dark adaptation before their glows can be perceived. 
There have been a number of speculations on the function of fungal bioluminescence. For example, it has been suggested that the lights of mushrooms repel negatively phototropic fungivores, attract arthropods that then excrete in the vicinity of the fungus and so nurture it, and act as an aposematic display of distastefulness (at least one luminous species, the Japanese Pleurotus japonicus, is a common cause of human poisoning).
Perhaps the oldest of these hypotheses is that the lights attract spore-dispersers, insects that either contact and mechanically distribute spores, or feed upon and then defecate spores. Currently, some studies seem to indicate that a relationship based on positive phototropism may exist between luminous mushrooms and certain flies, and even that topography and timing of lights in fruiting bodies are suggestive of guiding dispersers. 
Although this issue is not yet fully clarified, is a fact that mushroom lights play some communicative role in the biology of their emitters.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©James Winder and Michael Pilkington | Locality: China

libutron:

Some notes on bioluminescence in fungi

Some fungi emit light. Luminescence can be present in mycelia (as in a number of Mycena species) or in both the mycelia and the fruiting body (as in North American populations of Panellus stypticus).

Mushroom (fruiting body) lights have been described as blue, white, or green depending on the species; and emission intensities vary considerably.

It is said that in the forests of Borneo Mycena manipularis (shown above) are visible at 40 meters. It has also been said that it is even possible to read in the light of the fungi. Others mushrooms are dimmer and the eye often requires several minutes of dark adaptation before their glows can be perceived. 

There have been a number of speculations on the function of fungal bioluminescence. For example, it has been suggested that the lights of mushrooms repel negatively phototropic fungivores, attract arthropods that then excrete in the vicinity of the fungus and so nurture it, and act as an aposematic display of distastefulness (at least one luminous species, the Japanese Pleurotus japonicus, is a common cause of human poisoning).

Perhaps the oldest of these hypotheses is that the lights attract spore-dispersers, insects that either contact and mechanically distribute spores, or feed upon and then defecate spores. Currently, some studies seem to indicate that a relationship based on positive phototropism may exist between luminous mushrooms and certain flies, and even that topography and timing of lights in fruiting bodies are suggestive of guiding dispersers. 

Although this issue is not yet fully clarified, is a fact that mushroom lights play some communicative role in the biology of their emitters.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©James Winder and Michael Pilkington | Locality: China

(via luminolounge)

a-light-to-you-in-dark-places:

Waitomo Glowworm Caves, New Zealand.

The Waitomo Glowworm Caves were first explored in 1887 by local Maori Chief Tane Tinorau accompanied by an English surveyor Fred Mace. Local Maori people knew of the Caves existence, but the subterranean caverns had never been extensively explored until Fred and Tane went to investigate. They built a raft of flax stems and with candles as their only lighting, floated into the cave where the stream goes underground.

As they entered the caves, their first discovery was the Glowworm Grotto with its myriad of tiny bright lights dotting the cave ceiling. As their eyes adjusted to the darkness, they saw a multitude of lights reflecting off the water. Looking up, they discovered that the ceilings were dotted with the lights of thousands of glowworms.”

(via luminolounge)